Oh my.

I just finished reading a truly bad book that was NOT written by anyone here in LJ land but was a random YA I grabbed at the library. 

Now I’m really motivated to write well during my revisions today.  

Bad literature can be inspirational, don’t you think?

                             

 

23 thoughts on “Oh my.

  1. I read a real stinker recently too. You’re right, there’s something strangely encouraging about reading a book that reminds me of what NOT to do.
    Happy revisions to you!

    Like

    • I’m glad you said that, Jennifer, because after I posted this I started wondering if maybe I was a little odd for thinking that way. But it really did get me all pumped to write well today. And you know what? I think I did!

      Like

      • I’m so glad you had a good revision day. I know you don’t like to give details while you’re working on something, but what type, roughly, of story have you got going? MG? YA? Fantasy? HF? what? roughly, that is. Just curious.

        Like

      • Thank you, Jennifer. And what a nice photo!
        It’s a contemporary upper MG. So far everything thing I’ve written has been contemporary fiction (although I just read somewhere that a book set in the 70s was considered HF (or was it the 60s?) and the first book I wrote is set in the 70s so maybe there’s a little variety. HA

        Like

      • Thanks for saying nice photo. I always love seeing what people look like, so I figured it was time to come out.
        I wonder if we write similar stuff. My first book is a multi-cultural, contemporary upper MG and my second one, the one I’m still working on, is a young YA set in the 70’s. How well received was your 70’s novel? Are publishers interested in the 70’s? I am nervous.

        Like

      • I wrote my 70s book as an adult novel and got two readings with a small publisher that ultimately passed because it straddled YA (and they don’t do YA). I’m actually thinking about reworking it as a YA.
        I wouldn’t be nervous about your book; as long as it’s a story you want and need to tell, that’s all that’s within your control. Write it and then see what happens, right?

        Like

  2. I read a real stinker recently too. You’re right, there’s something strangely encouraging about reading a book that reminds me of what NOT to do.

    Happy revisions to you!

    Like

  3. I’m feeling pretty good about this chapter overall. But some of it doesn’t hang together as tightly as it might/as well as I’d like. May I send it to you for your feedback sometime later tonight or early tomorrow morning? I’d so love to have your help in getting the stink out.

    Thanks for asking about it, Tracy. ((HUGS))

    Like

  4. I wrote my first novel after reading a long, long series of cruddy teen soap opera-esque novels. I kept reading them (okay, I wanted to know what happened next too) because their badness was VERY motivating!

    Like

  5. Thank you, Jennifer. And what a nice photo!

    It’s a contemporary upper MG. So far everything thing I’ve written has been contemporary fiction (although I just read somewhere that a book set in the 70s was considered HF (or was it the 60s?) and the first book I wrote is set in the 70s so maybe there’s a little variety. HA

    Like

  6. Thanks for saying nice photo. I always love seeing what people look like, so I figured it was time to come out.

    I wonder if we write similar stuff. My first book is a multi-cultural, contemporary upper MG and my second one, the one I’m still working on, is a young YA set in the 70’s. How well received was your 70’s novel? Are publishers interested in the 70’s? I am nervous.

    Like

  7. I wrote my 70s book as an adult novel and got two readings with a small publisher that ultimately passed because it straddled YA (and they don’t do YA). I’m actually thinking about reworking it as a YA.

    I wouldn’t be nervous about your book; as long as it’s a story you want and need to tell, that’s all that’s within your control. Write it and then see what happens, right?

    Like

Comments are closed.